How Many Calories Should I Eat a Day?

The number of calories you need to eat each day depends on several factors, including your age, size, height, sex, lifestyle, and overall general health.

As an example, a physically active 6ft 2in male, aged 22 years, requires considerably more calories than a 5ft 2ins sedentary woman in her 70s.

It has been discovered that factors such as how you eat your food can influence how many calories get into your system. The longer you chew your food, the more calories the body retains, a team from Purdue University found.

If you would like to learn more about calories – what they are and what they are important for – you might want to take a look at our Knowledge Center article all about calories. The rest of this article will discuss how your body uses calories and how many your body might need to achieve optimum energy levels.

Facts on daily calorie intake

Here are some key points about daily calorie intake. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  • Recommended calorie intake depends on factors such as age, size, height, sex, lifestyle and overall general health.
  • The longer you chew your food, the more calories your body retains.
  • Recommended daily calorie intakes in the US are 2,700 for men and 2,200 for women.
  • Eating a big breakfast could help with weight reduction and maintenance.
  • When food is eaten may matter as much as what and how many calories are eaten.
  • Average calorie consumption in industrialized nations and a growing number of emerging economies is higher than it used to be.
  • Approximately 20% of the energy used in the human body is for brain metabolism.
  • Ideal body weight depends on several factors including age, bone density and muscle-fat ratio.
  • The types of food that calories are acquired from are highly important in terms of nutrition.
  • A 500-calorie meal consisting of fruits and vegetables is much better for your health and will keep you from being hungry for longer than a 500-calorie snack of popcorn.

Recommended daily calorie intakes

Recommended daily calorie intakes vary across the world. According to the National Health Service (NHS), UK, the average male adult needs approximately 2,500 calories per day to keep his weight constant, while the average adult female needs 2,000. US authorities recommend 2,700 calories per day for men and 2,200 for women.

The NHS stresses that rather than precisely counting numbers (calories), people should focus more on eating a healthy and well-balanced diet, being physically active, and roughly balancing how many calories are consumed with the numbers burnt off each day. If you eat your five portions of fruit and vegetable per day, you will probably live longer, Swedish researchers reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (July 2013 issue).

According to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the average person’s minimum calorie requirement per day globally is approximately 1,800 kilocalories (7,500 kJ).

Worldwide food consumption
Daily calorie consumption varies considerably around the world
(countries in grey indicates “no data available”)
Image by Interchange88

Over the last twenty years, sugar has been added to a growing number of foods we consume. Unfortunately, food labels in the USA and Europe do not include details on how much-added sugar there is. Dr Aseem Malhotra, a cardiologist, wrote in BMJ in June 2013 that “(it has become) almost impossible for consumers to determine the amount of added sugars in foods and beverages.”

Timing could be as important as how many calories you eat

A big breakfast helps bring your weight down or keep it down – researchers from Tel Aviv University explained in the medical journal Obesity that a large breakfast – one containing approximately 700 calories – is ideal for losing weight and reducing your risk of diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol.

When we eat our food probably matters as much as what and how many calories we eat, team leader Prof. Daniela Jakubowicz added.

Portion sizes

In industrialized nations and a growing number of emerging economies, people are consuming much more calories than they used to. Portion sizes in restaurants, both fast food ones as well as elegant places, are far greater today.

Comparing cheeseburger sizes over the last 20 years
The average cheeseburger in the USA 20 years ago had 333 calories, compared to the one’s today with over 600 calories

What is the difference between calories and kilocalories?

Scientifically speaking, one kilocalorie is 1,000 calories. However, the term calorie in lay English has become so loosely used with the same meaning as kilocalorie, that the two terms have virtually merged. In other words, in most cases, a calorie and kilocalorie have the same meaning.

A kilocalorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water from 15° to 16° Celsius (centigrade) in one atmosphere.

A “small calorie” refers to the traditional scientific term of calorie, meaning one-thousandth of a kilocalorie.

Internationally, most nations talk about food energy in kJ (kilojoules). 1 kcal (kilocalorie) = 4.184 kJ.

In this article, the term “calorie” means the same as “kilocalorie” or “kcal”.

Calorie intake calculator

The Harris-Benedict equation, also known as the Harris-Benedict principle, is used to estimate what a person’s BMR (basal metabolic rate) and daily requirements are.

Your BMR total is multiplied by another number which represents your level of physical activity. The resulting number is your recommended daily calorie intake in order to keep your body weight where it is.

This equation has some limitations. It does not take into account varying levels of muscle mass to fat mass ratios – a very muscular person needs more calories, even when resting.

BMR Equation

    • Male adults
      66.5 + (13.75 x kg body weight) + (5.003 x height in cm) – (6.755 x age) = BMR
      66 + ( 6.23 x pounds body weight) + ( 12.7 x height in inches ) – ( 6.76 x age) = BMR

 

  • Female adults
    55.1 + (9.563 x kg body weight) + (1.850 x height in cm) – (4.676 x age) = BMR
    655 + (4.35 x kg body weight) + (4.7 x height in inches) – (4.7 x age) = BMR

Daily calorie calculators

You can use our BMR calculators below to work out your BMR and daily calorie recommendation. One calculator uses metric measurements and the other uses imperial measurements – the choice is yours.

1) Metric BMR Calculator

Please note that both of these calculators require JavaScript to be enabled in your browser settings. Results will appear in the box underneath these calculators.

Gender: Female
Male
Age:
(years)
Height:
(in cm, e.g: 183)
Weight:
(in kg, e.g: 63)

2) Imperial BMR Calculator

Gender: Female
Male
Age:
(years)
Height:
feet:
inches:
Weight:
stones:
pounds:

 

BMR calculation results will appear here.

Your daily calorie requirement

To work out a figure for your daily calorie requirement, we apply levels of physical activity to the equation as per the guide below. If you have entered information into the calculator above, you’ll see your personal calculations:

    • Sedentary lifestyle – if you do very little or no exercise at all
      Your daily calorie requirement is BMR x 1.2.

 

    • Slightly active lifestyle – light exercise between once and three times per week
      Your daily calorie requirement is BMR x 1.375.

 

    • Moderately active lifestyle – if you do moderate exercise three to five days per week
      Your daily calorie requirement is BMR x 1.55.

 

    • Active lifestyle – if you do intensive/heavy exercise six to seven times per week
      Your daily calorie requirement is BMR x 1.725.

 

  • Very active lifestyle – if you do very heavy/intensive exercise twice a day (extra heavy workouts
    Your daily calorie requirement is BMR x 1.9.

The human body and energy usage

For the human body to remain alive, it requires energy. Approximately 20% of the energy we use is for brain metabolism. The majority of the rest of the body’s energy requirements are taken up for the basal metabolic requirements – the energy we need when in a resting state, for functions such as the circulation of the blood and breathing.

If our environment is cold, our metabolism increases to produce more heat to maintain a constant body temperature. When we are in a warm environment, we require less energy.

We also require mechanical energy for our skeletal muscles for posture and moving around.

Respiration or specifically cellular respiration refers to the metabolic process by which an organism gets energy by reacting oxygen with glucose to produce carbon dioxide, water and ATP energy. How efficiently energy from respiration converts into physical (mechanical) power depends on the type of food eaten, as well as what type of physical energy is used – whether muscles are used aerobically or anaerobically.

Put simply – we need calories to stay alive, even if we are not moving, and need calories to keep our posture and to move about.

How much should you weigh?

As with how many calories you should consume, your ideal body weight depends on several factors. These include your age, sex, bone density, muscle-fat ratio, and height.

    • BMI (Body Mass Index) – some say BMI is a good way of working out what you should weigh. However, BMI does not take into account muscle mass. A 100-metre Olympic champion weighing 200 pounds (about 91 kilograms), who is 6 feet (about 1mt 83cm) tall, who has the same BMI as a couch potato of the same height, is not overweight, while the couch potato is overweight.

 

    • Waist-hip ratio – this measurement is said to be more accurate at determining what your ideal weight should be, compared to BMI. However, the waist-hip ratio does not properly measure an individual’s total body fat percentage (muscle-to-fat ratio) and is also limited.

 

  • Waist-to-height ratio – this way of determining ideal body weight is probably the most accurate one available today. It was presented by Dr. Margaret Ashwell, ex-science director of the British Nutrition Foundation, and team at the 19th Congress on Obesity in Lyon, France, on 12th May 2012. It is also a very simple calculation; easy for lay people to work out.

Dr. Ashwell’s team found that:

Keeping your waist circumference to less than half your height can help increase life expectancy for every person in the world.”

Put simply, to achieve and/or maintain your ideal body weight, “Keep your waist circumference to less than half your height.”

If you are a 6ft (183cm) tall adult male, your waist should not exceed 36 inches (91 cm).

If you are a 5ft 4 inches (163 cm) tall adult female, your waist should not exceed 32 inches (81 cm)

How do I measure my waist? – according to the World Health Organization (WHO), you should place the tape-measure half-way between the lower rib and the iliac crest (the pelvic bone at the hip).

Calories and different diets

A chef's salad
Taking 500 calories from this dish is much better for the health, preventing hunger, and maintaining a healthy body weight than the equivalent calories in popcorn with butter or toffee

Simply counting calories, and ignoring what you put in your mouth might not lead to good health.

Insulin levels will rise significantly more after consuming carbohydrates than after eating fats (no rise at all) or protein. Some carbohydrates, also known as carbs, get into the bloodstream in the form of sugar (glucose) much faster than others. Refined flour is a fast carb, while coarse oatmeal is slow. Slow-release carbs are better for body weight control and overall health than fast carbs.

A 500-calorie meal of fish/meat, salad, and some olive oil, followed by fruit, is much better for your health and will keep you from being hungry for longer than a 500-calorie snack of popcorn with butter or toffee.

There are several diets today which claim to help people lose or maintain their body weight. Some of these have been extremely successful and good for participants, but are notoriously difficult to adhere to long-term.

Crooked Bear Creek Holistic Wellness Center recently published an article discussing the “Eight Most Popular Diets”. The rankings were based on how many articles mentioned them favorably, how popular they were generally and which ones received the most positive feedback.

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Calculating How Many Calories Are Burned In A Day

The number of calories burned each day is directly linked to weight loss, weight gain, or weight maintenance.

For a person to lose weight, they must burn more calories than they take in, creating a calorie deficit. But, to do this, they need to know how many calories they burn each day.

In this article, we take a look at how someone can work out how many calories they burn in a day.

What is a calorie?

Close up of nutritional information on the back of a food label, showing calorie energy, protein, carbohydrate, sugar, and fat content.
The three main food groups — proteins, carbohydrates, and fats — have different calorie contents. Most food products will display the nutritional content, including calories.

Most people think of calories as only having to do with food and weight loss. However, a calorie is a unit of heat energy. A calorie is the amount of energy that is needed to raise 1 gram (g) of water by 1°C.

This measurement can be applied to lots of different energy releasing mechanisms outside of the human body. For the human body, calories are a measure of how much energy the body needs to function.

Food contains calories. Different food has different calorie counts, meaning that each food has a different amount of potential energy.

There are three basic types of foods that make up all the food that humans eat: carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. These three different types of food have varying amounts of potential energy per g.

The calorie breakdowns per g for each food type are as follows:

  • Carbohydrates: 4 calories per g
  • Proteins: 4 calories per g
  • Fats: 9 calories per g

Calculating how many calories are burned

Person calculating.
Calculating calories consumed and burned up may help with weight management. Various apps and websites are available to aid this process.

Being able to work out how many calories are burned each day is essential to any person looking to maintain, lose, or gain weight.

Knowing what factors contribute to calorie burning can help a person alter their diet or exercise program to accommodate the goal.

An accepted method to calculate how many calories a person burns each day is the Harris-Benedict Formula.

Originally developed in the early 20th century, it was revamped in 1984 and again in 1990 to help improve its accuracy.

The Harris-Benedict formula is a relatively simple process in which a person multiplies their basal metabolic rate (BMR) by their average daily activity level.

BMR is the number of calories a person burns by simply existing. BMR varies based on age, sex, size, and genetics. To calculate BMR, a person uses inches for height, pounds for weight, and years of age in the following formulas:

  • For men: 66 + (6.2 x weight) + (12.7 x height) – (6.76 x age)
  • For women: 655.1 + (4.35 x weight) + (4.7 x height) – (4.7 x age)

The results of the BMR calculation are then used to multiply the average daily activity of the person. Points are awarded based on how active a person is.

Points for activity levels are as follows:

  • 1.2 points for a person who does little to no exercise
  • 1.37 points for a slightly active person who does light exercise 1–3 days a week
  • 1.55 points for a moderately active person who performs moderate exercise 3–5 days a week
  • 1.725 points for a very active person who exercises hard 6–7 days a week
  • 1.9 points for an extra active person who either has a physically demanding job or has a particularly challenging exercise routine

When the BMR is calculated and the activities points are determined, the two scores are multiplied. The total is the number of calories burned on an average day.

For example, to calculate how many calories a 37-year-old, 6-foot-tall, and 170-pound man who is moderately active burns, the formula would look like:

(66 + (6.2 x 170) + (12.7 x 72) – (6.76 x 37)) x 1.55 = 2,663 calories/day

This figure shows that a man of this age, height, weight, and activity level can consume 2,663 calories and maintain his current weight. He could increase or decrease weight by consuming more or less than this amount over the course of several days.

For those who do not wish to make the calculations themselves, there are a range of calorie calculators available online. Most use a similar formula to work out calories burned.

A doctor or nutritionist should also be able to help people work out how many calories they burn each day.

Factors influencing daily calorie burn

Many factors affect how many calories a person burns each day. Some of the factors that influence daily calorie burn are not in a person’s control while others can be changed.

These factors include:

  • Age: the older a person is, the fewer calories burned per day.
  • Sex: men burn more calories than women.
  • Amount of daily activity: those who move more, burn more calories.
  • Body composition: those with more muscle burn more calories than those who have less muscle.
  • Body size: larger people burn more calories than smaller people, even at rest.
  • Thermogenesis: this is the amount of energy the body uses to break down food.
  • Pregnancy: pregnant women burn more calories than non-pregnant women.
  • Breastfeeding: women who are breastfeeding also burn extra calories.

Calories burned by exercise or activities

Woman vacuuming her house.
All activities use up calories, even housework such as vacuuming. More intense physical activity such as aerobics will burn more calories.

Calorie counts for exercise and activity will vary from person to person. Age, sex, body type, and size influence how many calories an individual will burn doing a physical activity.

In general, more intense or strenuous activity will burn more calories than lighter effort exercise.

The following calorie counts are based on a 155-pound person doing the following exercise or activity for 30 minutes:

  • aerobics: 211
  • stationary bike (light effort): 176
  • stationary bike (moderate effort): 247
  • dusting: 70
  • gardening: 176
  • grocery shopping: 106
  • hiking: 211
  • house cleaning: 106
  • jogging: 247
  • running 12-minute miles: 282
  • running 10-minute miles: 352
  • running 7.5-minute miles: 428
  • laundry, including folding clothes: 70
  • mowing the lawn (no riding mowers): 141
  • playing with kids at the playground: 141
  • cooking: 70
  • raking: 141
  • shoveling snow: 211
  • tennis (singles): 282
  • vacuuming: 70
  • brisk walking: 141
  • walking while pushing a stroller: 70
  • weightlifting: 106
  • yoga: 141

Anyone that wants to figure out how many calories they burn can input their statistics into a calorie calculator and find personalized results.

Tips for losing weight

People looking to lose weight should try to create a calorie deficit by following these tips:

  • moving more
  • eating a lower calorie diet full of healthful fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins
  • getting enough sleep
  • drinking more water

Losing weight can be very tough to do. Understanding how many calories an individual’s body burns per day and what to do to increase daily calorie burn is the key to success.

“Low-Content” Nutritional Claims on Packaged Goods Misleading for Consumers

No fat, no sugar, no salt? What does it mean? Today, supermarket shelves are filled with products that make a variety of claims related to their perceived health benefits. As many Americans try to make better food choices, companies have been quick to adopt packaging that makes “low-content” nutrient claims such as “low-fat” or “low-sodium.” Because there is no uniformity to what these statements mean, consumers are often left confused and ill-informed. A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that simply making a low-content claim on the label was not a reliable indicator of a product’s actual nutritional quality and that these claims may give consumers a false sense of confidence about the healthfulness of their food.

Investigators wanted to examine what effects these low-content claims had on purchasing habits, as well as what relationship they had to the actual nutritional content of foods. After looking at data that included over 80 million food and beverage purchases from over 40,000 households, they found that 13% of food and 35% of beverage purchases had a low-content claim, and that “low-fat” was the most common claim, followed by “low-calorie,” “low-sugar,” and “low-sodium.” While the data revealed that products with some sort of claim had lower mean energy, total sugar, total fat, and sodium densities, they did not always represent the best nutritional value. The study suggests that because labels only need to make claims relative to other similar foods and not a standard definition of what “low” means, these claims do not offer consumers any real information or give a good indication of the general healthiness of the food.

“Our results demonstrate that for overall packaged foods and beverages, purchases featuring a low-/no-nutrients claim do not necessarily offer better overall nutritional profiles or even better profiles for the particular nutrients that are the subject of the claim, relative to other choices with no claim,” explained lead investigator Lindsey Smith Taillie, PhD, researcher assistant professor, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “This is likely due in part to “low” or “reduced” claims being relative within brands or specific food categories.”

Because there is, for example, no agreement about what constitutes a low-sugar cookie, researchers say consumers need to be cautious. A cookie that is marked “low-sugar” may contain less sugar than the “regular” version, but that low-sugar claim doesn’t guarantee it contains less sugar than other cookies. “In other words,” remarked Dr. Taillie, “a low-/no-nutrient claim means different things for different foods. This could potentially lead to confusion if consumers focus on seeking out products with specific nutrient claims or use a claim to justify the purchase of less-healthy foods. In fact, these results suggest (but are not conclusive) that in some cases, products that tend to be high in calories, sodium, sugar, or fat actually may be more likely to have low-/no-content claims.”

While the study focused on whether these claims had any connection to the actual nutritional value of the food and beverage items, investigators also looked at the groups who were more likely to purchase foods that made these statements. They found that while differences in purchasing patterns by race/ethnicity were not significant, non-Hispanic white households were the most likely to buy products with a “low-calorie” claim and that Asian households preferred foods with “low-fat” or “low-sodium” claims. Non-Hispanic black households were the least likely to purchase food groups with any low-content claim.

There was also a connection between socioeconomic status (SES) and food purchases. Researchers found that high- and middle-SES households were more likely to purchase food and beverages with low-content claims.

As consumers try to navigate an ever-increasing number of food and beverage choices, being able to parse what these claims mean will become even more critical. These findings show how the lack of consistency about what these statements mean can lead content claims to be used to sell generally unhealthy foods as a healthier alternative. “A key question for future research will be to examine how these claims affect consumer choice, as well as how claims interact with other common strategies, like sales or price promotions, to influence purchasing behavior and ultimately, dietary quality,” concluded Dr. Taillie.

This work was conducted at the Duke-UNC USDA Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research (BECR) and funded by Healthy Eating Research, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Article: No Fat, No Sugar, No Salt . . . No Problem? Prevalence of “Low-Content” Nutrient Claims and Their Associations with the Nutritional Profile of Food and Beverage Purchases in the United States, Lindsey Smith Taillie, PhD, Shu Wen Ng, PhD, Ya Xue, PhD, Emily Busey, MPH, RD, Matthew Harding, PhD, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2017.01.011, published online 15 March 2017.

Is Shrimp High in Cholesterol? Nutritional and Heart Health Information

Eating shrimp as part of a balanced diet is not only safe but can offer a person several key nutrients.

Doctors previously recommended against eating shrimp as part of a heart-healthy diet, citing the high levels of cholesterol.

However, after years of research and a better understanding of what contributes to heart disease and higher cholesterol, scientists now consider eating shrimp to be an excellent addition to a well-rounded diet.

Is shrimp high in cholesterol?

shrimp prawn on a grill
Shrimp may be eaten as part of a balanced diet, and the way it is prepared is key to its effect on cholesterol.

One serving of shrimp contains 189 milligrams of cholesterol, which translates to roughly 60 percent of the total recommended amount of cholesterol per day.

This high level of cholesterol was the reason why doctors used to believe that shrimp was bad for heart health.

It was thought that shrimp would increase levels of LDL, or “bad cholesterol” in people, but it is now known that is not the case.

Shrimp can actually increase the levels of HDL, or “good cholesterol” thereby supporting heart health.

Are they safe to eat for people with high cholesterol?

Shrimp are now generally considered safe for people with high cholesterol to eat. They contain a number of useful nutrients.

Despite the higher cholesterol levels, shrimp contain minimal saturated fat and no trans fat. Both trans and saturated fat are considered factors to increasing bad cholesterol.

As part of a balanced diet, shrimp can be a good addition. People on a strict diet set by a doctor or dietitian should ask their provider before including shrimp.

Things to consider when eating shrimp

What is more damaging to cholesterol and a heart-healthy diet is not the shrimp so much as the way it is prepared.

Here are some general tips and suggestions for preparing shrimp to be as heart-healthy and low in cholesterol as possible:

Do:

  • bake, boil, grill, or cook with little to no oil
  • season with spices, garlic, and herbs
  • add lemon juice

Don’t:

  • fry, sauté in butter or oil
  • serve in a creamy or buttery sauce
  • add unnecessary salt when cooking and eating
  • serve with over-processed carbohydrates such as white pasta

Check the bag, box, or with the seafood department as to where the shrimp were caught or raised. Shrimp from farms in other countries often have higher levels of pollutants because of the unregulated farming practices.

Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell whether or not the shrimp being sold comes from a safe farming practice or even if it was caught in the wild. Both farmed and wild-caught shrimp run a risk of containing pollutants, so look for the labels, “sustainably farmed” or “MSC-certified” that indicate better choices.

One last consideration for consuming shrimp is that it is a known allergen to some people. Shrimp are shellfish, so people allergic to shellfish should avoid eating them.

Nutritional information for shrimp

shrimp prawn in the shape of a heart
Shrimp are low in calories, high in protein, and a great source of selenium and B12.

Shrimp, like most seafood, offers a variety of nutrients that are recommended in any diet.

Shrimp are naturally low in calories, offering less than 100 calories per serving. Additionally, shrimp are low in fat and high in protein.

Some additional benefits of shrimp include:

  • Excellent source of selenium, an antioxidant that helps reduce the free radicals often responsible for premature aging and disease.
  • Great source of vitamin B12 that helps with red blood cell creation among other benefits.
  • Good source of phosphorus that is essential for removing waste and repairing tissues and cells.
  • Provides choline, copper, and iodine to the diet, which are all necessary to the body’s functions.
  • Also provides astaxanthin, an antioxidant that helps reduce inflammation and fight signs of aging.

How do they compare with other forms of seafood?

Seafood is getting a lot of praise lately from doctors and dietitians who recommend adding seafood regularly to a balanced diet. Shrimp, like a lot of shellfish and other food sources found in the sea, are high in cholesterol. This does not mean that they are necessarily dangerous for people to consume regularly, however.

Other popular seafood options may offer less cholesterol and similar health benefits. Here are a few other seafood sources and how they compare to shrimp.

Crab

Crab meat, like most seafood, is high in protein and is low in fat and calories. Crab contains less cholesterol and contains an assortment of vitamins.

However, unlike shrimp, crab is naturally higher in sodium levels. This makes it a bit of a challenge for people with high blood pressure.

Lobster

One of the pricier alternatives to shrimp is lobster. This shellfish has a slightly higher level of cholesterol than shrimp. However, like shrimp, lobster is also low calorie, low in saturated fat, high in omega-3 and selenium, and has about 24 grams of protein in a single serving.

salmon
Although salmon may have a higher fat content than shrimp, it has less cholesterol per serving.

Salmon

Salmon is rich in heart-healthy omega-3. Salmon also has a higher fat content than either lobster or shrimp. Salmon has less cholesterol per serving than shrimp.

A serving of salmon is also high in protein and filled with B vitamins, which boost energy and support metabolism and a healthy nervous system.

Additionally, salmon is an excellent source of potassium and phosphorus, a nutrient that helps bone development. Potassium helps regulate the heart and blood pressure. For the most nutrients, look for wild salmon.

Oysters, clams, and mussels

This group of seafood is packed full of nutrients such as iron, zinc, B12, phosphorus, niacin, and selenium. Clams both boost good cholesterol and lower bad cholesterol.

Though shrimp is high in cholesterol, it is still considered a good choice for anyone, even those concerned about their heart health.

People on strict diets should talk with their doctor before adding shrimp into their diets.

All people should consider the potential risks of purchasing farm-raised shrimp that may contain more pollutants than fresh-caught shrimp.

In moderation, shrimp consumption for the average person can add many nutrients essential to the human body.